Tuesday, 4 July 2017

Sign Language Taster session

We were very fortunate to have Miggy come and teach us some NZ Sign Language today. Miggy is deaf and it was fascinating watching and learning off him!



Here are some links to learning NZSL at home


Thursday, 8 June 2017

Grandparents Day

What special visitors we had join us today!

Kemly's grandmother told us all about going to school as a litttle girl in Vanuatu. She went to school by boat!

Caitlin's great grandparents told us all sorts of things about what it was like going to school when they were younger. Caitlin's Great Grandad went by coal train - and he got the cane once for turning the taps on and blocking the drains in the bathroom! Caitlin's Great Grandma went to lots of different schools growing up. At one stage she had to walk for 2 hours to get to school!

We also had Josh's grandmother tell us about growing up in Cambodia and Ellarose's grandmother told us about life in the Hutt.

Such a special time! Thanks so much for coming to Room 4!

Football Skills

Today we had the first of 4 sessions with coaches from the Tawa Football Club. (Click on photo for view more)


Friday, 2 June 2017

Matariki Stars

Matariki Celebrations happen a bit late this year - June 25 is when they officially start. We've got in a bit early with creating these beautiful Matariki Stars
See here for more information about Matariki. Hampton Hill is having our own celebrations for Matariki on 29 June. A community evening sharing in fun activities - including a hangi and viewing the night sky with Chris Monigatti from Tawa College. 3.30-6pm. More info in the school newsletter.

Friday, 26 May 2017

STEAM!

We try to have Steam sessions each week for an hour if we get the chance. 

STEAM stands for:
Science
Technology
Engineering
Art

Maths





Thursday, 25 May 2017

Pataka Trip

We had a beautiful day for our trip to Pataka today. What fun we had pretending to be pupils at an olden day school, looking at old implements, washing and ironing, and dressing up!

 Click on the photo to see more from the day.

Wednesday, 17 May 2017

Science Challenge 2017

A great time tonight at our annual Science Challenge. This year people had to come up with a device that would launch a ping pong ball into the air and stay airborne for as long as possible. Hmmm! Lots of different designs - not as easy as you'd like to think!

Way to go everyone!


Surface Tension

Here's a really easy experiment - using water tension, a little like the milk mosaic one.

Start off with a plate of water. Sprinkle pepper on the top. We noticed that it just sat on top. 
Then we added some detergent - look what happened!

video

Milk Mosaic

Today we made wonderful marbling patterns with food colouring and milk!







video


Try this at home!!

Milk Mosaic
Materials
 Milk (whole )
 Dinner plate
 Food colouring (red, yellow, green, blue)
 Dish-washing liquid
 Cotton buds
Procedure:
1. Pour enough milk in the dinner plate to completely cover the bottom to the depth of about 1-2 cm. Allow the milk to settle.
2. Add one drop of each of the four colours of food colouring - red, yellow, blue, and green - to the milk. Keep the drops close together in the centre of the plate of milk.
3. Find a clean cotton bud for the next part of the experiment. Predict what will happen when you touch the tip of the cotton bud to the centre of the milk. It's important not to stir the mix. Just touch it with the tip of the cotton bud. Go ahead and try it. Did anything happen?
4. Now place a drop of dish washing liquid on the other end of the cotton bud Place the soapy end of the cotton bud back in the middle of the milk and hold it there for 10 to 15 seconds. Look at that burst of colour
5. Add another drop of soap to the tip of the cotton bud and try it again. Experiment with placing the cotton bud at different places in the milk. Notice that the colours in the milk continue to move even when the cotton bud is removed. What makes the food colouring in the milk move?

Tuesday, 16 May 2017

Super Cold Bag

Today's experiment was an endothermic chemical reaction! Check this one out!

You Need:
·  Citric Acid
·  Baking Soda
·  Tap Water
·  Zip lock bag (15cm x 10cm)
·  Measuring cup
·  Plastic spoons

Perform this experiment over a kitchen sink. There is a small chance the zip lock bag will burst making a wet mess! Zip lock bags of different sizes can be used, but the quantity of chemicals added will vary. Trial and error will uncover the correct amount to use to blow the bag up fully.
What to do:
1.  Put one level teaspoon of citric acid in a zip lock bag.
2.  Put one teaspoon of baking soda in the same zip lock bag. And shake the bag gently to mix the two chemicals.
3.  Fill up the measuring cup with cold tap water (about 30ml).
4.  Here's where you have to be quick! Pour the water into the zip lock bag and snap it shut fast.
Not only does the bag blow up, it also becomes super cold! So don’t forget to feel its temperature.
5.  You can try putting about 20ml of vinegar and a flat teaspoon of baking soda into a zip lock bag and snapping it shut quickly. Compare the difference between this and the other combination of chemicals.
Why is it so?
Mixing citric acid, baking soda and water together causes a chemical reaction. The new chemical that is made is carbon dioxide gas. This gas fills the bag and causes it to blow up. You’ll also notice the bag drops in temperature as part of the chemical reaction




IMG_7294 from Mrs B on Vimeo.

Cross Country 2017

Great effort everyone today at Cross Country. Such an awesome effort - I'm so proud of you all!




Results found on our Sports Wiki 

Monday, 15 May 2017

Air Cannon Experiment

This week is Primary Science Week and that means loads of Science all week long!


Today we looked at how air moves with an air cannon. Using a bin (clean) with a hole in the bottom and a sheet of plastic tight over the top. Air is forced out by hitting the plastic hard - and can force the air to knock a paper cup off someone's head!
Air can be described as a fluid the way it moves around.


video


video



Here's a link to how to make a miniature version of this at home - let us know how you get on!